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Canada

(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 26, 2010

Sen. Jim Bunning (R-KY) in a Feb. 23 interview with Inside U.S. Trade said he is blocking Senate consideration of the nominations of Michael Punke to be deputy U.S. trade representative and Islam Siddiqui to be USTR's chief agricultural negotiator because of the administration's failure to fight Canada tobacco legislation, which opponents say effectively stops the sales of U.S. burley tobacco to Canada.

(Daily News)
February 23, 2010

Sen. Jim Bunning (R-KY) in an interview with Inside U.S. Trade today (Feb. 23) said he is blocking Senate consideration of the nominations of Michael Punke to be deputy U.S. trade representative and Islam Siddiqui to be chief agricultural negotiator because of the administration's failure to fight Canada tobacco legislation, which opponents say effectively stops the sales of U.S. burley tobacco to Canada.


(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 19, 2010

Government and business sources said this week that they hope the procurement deal between the U.S. and Canada which entered into force this week could dislodge the long-stalled efforts to renegotiate the World Trade Organization's plurilateral Government Procurement Agreement (GPA).

(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 19, 2010

The bilateral U.S.-Canada procurement agreement signed last week will create no obligations for the U.S. to extend the same market access to Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement, a U.S. trade official said on Feb. 12.

(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 19, 2010

The access of Canadian firms to seven projects funded by the stimulus package as negotiated under a U.S.-Canada bilateral procurement deal is prospective only, even though only one of the programs specifically stipulates that in the text of the agreement, a U.S. trade official said in a Feb. 12 press conference.

(File Document)
February 12, 2010

(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 12, 2010

Singapore this week criticized a tentative deal between the U.S. and Canada meant to further open procurement markets in both countries because the two countries offer concessions that, in the short term at least, will only apply to each other, not to other members of the World Trade Organization's Government Procurement Agreement (GPA).

(Inside U.S. Trade)
February 12, 2010

The U.S. and Canada late last week announced a tentative agreement that will give Canadian firms access to sub-federal U.S. government procurement contracts as well as temporary access to seven government programs funded by the stimulus package and that are now subject to Buy American requirements on iron, steel and manufactured goods.

(Daily News)
February 09, 2010

While Canada has agreed to sign up its provinces to the World Trade Organization's Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) as part of a bilateral deal with the United States announced last week, this commitment will only open its sub-federal procurement market to U.S. companies in the near term, and not to other GPA signatories.


(Text Document)
February 08, 2010

(Daily News)
February 05, 2010

The U.S. and Canada this morning (Feb. 5) announced a tentative agreement meant to address Canada's long-standing objection that its firms are largely unable to compete for U.S. state and sub-federal procurement contracts issued under the $787 billion stimulus package approved by the U.S. Congress early last year because of its "Buy American" provisions.


(File Document)
February 05, 2010

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